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BIMR Seminar Series Charles de Lannoy

Event Date: 
Thursday, February 16, 2017 - 3:30pm to 5:00pm

Title: Environmental applications of active surfaces: electrically conducting membranes and catalytic thin films

Bio: Charles-François de Lannoy is an Assistant Professor in Chemical Engineering at McMaster University. Prior to joining McMaster, he was a visiting scholar in the Energy Materials & Systems Lab at PARC, a Xerox Company in Palo Alto, California where he worked on various proprietary technologies including a novel CO2 captures process, an electrochemical membrane-based desalination technology, and a high resolution polymer extrusion technology. He obtained his B.Sc. with Honours in Physics from McGill University and his PhD in Environmental Engineering from Duke University. His post-doctoral studies were conducted at the Energy and Resources Engineering Department at Stanford University.  His research focuses on developing advanced nanocomposites and separation technologies for aquatic systems, novel materials and processes in gaseous separations, and the environmental applications and implications of these nanomaterials

Abstract: Separation technologies form the basis of most environmental and chemical processes, ranging from water treatment, to chemical catalysis, to gas purification. While superior to most conventional separations, membranes have many shortcomings that must still be overcome. My research has explored the development and application of active membrane and thin film surfaces that are electrically conductive, catalytic, or electro-catalytic. These membranes have the potential to enhance the effectiveness of conventional membrane separation, and in some cases, enable separations that would not otherwise be possible.

This talk will be divided between membranes and thin films for aqueous separations, and thin films for gaseous separations. With respect to aqueous separations, I will present a suite of flexible, electrically conductive membranes that I developed, and their applications to enhancing membrane operation, specifically in preventing biofouling and scaling on membrane surfaces. With respect to gas separations, I will present a detailed analysis of a metallic thin film that I developed with the potential to catalyze Nitrogen dissociation. Finally, I will discuss some of my preliminary research applying nanocomposite materials to reactive sorbents and next generation membrane surfaces, for in-situ environmental decontamination.

Charles-François de Lannoy is an Assistant Professor in Chemical Engineering at McMaster University. Prior to joining McMaster, he was a visiting scholar in the Energy Materials & Systems Lab at PARC, a Xerox Company in Palo Alto, California where he worked on various proprietary technologies including a novel CO2 captures process, an electrochemical membrane-based desalination technology, and a high resolution polymer extrusion technology. He obtained his B.Sc. with Honours in Physics from McGill University and his PhD in Environmental Engineering from Duke University. His post-doctoral studies were conducted at the Energy and Resources Engineering Department at Stanford University.  His research focuses on developing advanced nanocomposites and separation technologies for aquatic systems, novel materials and processes in gaseous separations, and the environmental applications and implications of these nanomaterials.

Event Location: 
McMaster
Location Details: 
ABB-165